Indiana coronavirus updates for April 27, 2022 | ICIN

The latest updates on the coronavirus pandemic for Wednesday, April 27, 2022.

INDIANAPOLIS — Here are Wednesday’s latest updates on the coronavirus pandemic, including the latest news on COVID-19 vaccinations and testing in Indiana.

Registrations for the vaccine are now open for Hoosiers 5 and older through the Indiana State Department of Health. This story will be updated over the course of the day with more news on the COVID-19 pandemic.

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Dr. Fauci says US COVID pandemic no longer ‘full-blown’

America’s top infectious disease expert said this week that the U.S. is no longer in a “full-blown explosive pandemic phase,” while emphasizing that the COVID-19 pandemic at a global-scale will likely last for some time. 

In an interview with the Washington Post on Wednesday, Dr. Anthony Fauci clarified comments he made during a Tuesday interview with PBS News in which he said the U.S. was “out of the pandemic phase.” Fauci told the Post that the U.S. is now transitioning into a more “controlled endemicity,” where subvariant cases, like those from BA.2 and BA.2.12.1, remain high but hospitalization levels do not match those from last fall’s omicron surge.

“Right now, we’re at a low enough level that I believe that we’re transitioning into endemicity. … We’re not in the full-blown explosive pandemic phase. That does not mean that the pandemic is over,” Fauci told the Washington Post. “A pandemic means widespread infection throughout the world. … In our country we’re transitioning into more of a controlled endemicity.”

According to data from the CDC, current COVID cases and hospitalization rates are slightly rising again, but deaths have continued on a downward trend. Moreover, the CDC now estimates that more than half of all Americans show signs of previous COVID infections.

Pfizer asks FDA to authorize COVID booster for kids 5 to 11 years old

Pfizer on Tuesday said it has asked the Food and Drug Administration to authorize a booster dose of its COVID vaccine for children from 5 to 11 years old. 

U.S. health authorities already urge everyone 12 and older to get one booster dose for the best protection against the newest variants — and recently gave the option of a second booster to those 50 and older.

Pfizer first announced its intention to apply for emergency use authorization earlier in April, releasing new data it said showed 5-to-11-year-olds could benefit from another kid-size shot.

In the small study, 140 youngsters who’d already gotten two shots were given a booster six months later, and researchers found the extra shot generally revved up their immune response. But a closer look at 30 of the children found a 36-fold increase in virus-fighting antibodies, levels high enough to fight the super-contagious omicron variant, Pfizer and its partner BioNTech said in a mid-April press release. 

Pfizer tested the kid booster while omicron was surging this winter. While COVID-19 cases now are at much lower levels in the U.S., in recent weeks an even more contagious version of omicron, called BA.2, has become the dominant type locally and around the world.

CDC estimates 3 in 4 kids have had COVID

Three out of every four U.S. children have been infected with the coronavirus, and more than half of all Americans had signs of previous infections, CDC researchers estimated in a report Tuesday.

The researchers examined blood samples from more than 200,000 Americans and looked for virus-fighting antibodies made from infections, not vaccines. They found that signs of past infection rose dramatically between December and February, when the more contagious omicron variant surged through the U.S.

The most striking increase was in children. The percentage of those 17 and under with antibodies rose from about 45% in December to about 75% in February.

For Americans of all ages, about 34% had signs of prior infection in December. Just two months later, 58% did.

The older the people were, the less likely they had evidence of past infections, the study found. For those 65 and older, 19% had signs of prior infection in December and 33% did in February. That may be because older adults have higher vaccination rates, and they may be more likely to take other COVID-19 precautions, such as wearing masks and avoiding crowds.

Kamala Harris tests positive for COVID-19

Vice President Kamala Harris has tested positive for COVID-19, according to her press secretary, Kirsten Allen. Harris is not showing any symptoms, and will isolate and continue working from home.

Harris has not been a close contact to President Joe Biden or First Lady Jill Biden due to recent travel schedules.

Latest US, world numbers

There have been more than 81.10 million confirmed cases of COVID-19 in the United States as of 3:30 a.m. ET Wednesday, according to Johns Hopkins University. There have been more than 991,950 deaths recorded in the U.S.

Worldwide, there have been more than 511.05 million confirmed coronavirus cases with more than 6.22 million deaths and more than 11.25 billion vaccine doses administered.


For most people, the coronavirus causes mild or moderate symptoms. For some, especially older adults and people with existing health problems, it can cause more severe illness like pneumonia, or death.

COVID shots still work but researchers hunt new improvements

COVID-19 vaccines still offer strong protection against severe illness and death, but Moderna and Pfizer are testing combination shots as a possible new kind of booster. 

The vaccines now available in the U.S. were made to fight the original version of the virus. Variants are chipping away at some of their benefits, particularly their effectiveness against mild infection. The newer vaccine versions being tested are mixes — the original vaccine plus protection against the super-contagious omicron mutant. 

Other companies are pursuing nasal vaccines that might one day better prevent milder infections. The hunt for improvements comes amid concern that “booster fatigue” may dampen public confidence in the successful shots.

Updating the vaccine recipe to match the latest variants is risky, because the next mutant could be completely unrelated. So companies are taking a cue from the flu vaccine, which offers protection against three or four different strains in one shot every year.

Moderna and Pfizer are testing 2-in-1 COVID-19 protection that they hope to offer this fall. Each “bivalent” shot would mix the original, proven vaccine with an omicron-targeted version.

2nd COVID-19 booster shot available to Hoosiers 50 and up

The Indiana Department of Health announced Wednesday that Hoosiers age 50 and older, as well as those 12 and older with weakened immune systems, are now eligible to receive a second mRNA COVID-19 booster shot at least four months after their first booster dose.

The announcement comes one day after the Food and Drug Administration authorized an extra dose of the Pfizer or Moderna vaccine for that age group and and certain younger people with severely weakened immune systems.

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention later recommended the extra shot as an option but stopped short of urging that those eligible rush out and get it right away.

The IDOH is advising vaccine providers that they can begin administering second boosters of the Moderna and Pfizer vaccines to people who qualify.

The CDC also says that adults who received a primary vaccine and booster dose of the Johnson & Johnson vaccine at least four months ago may now receive a second booster dose of either mRNA vaccine.

You can find a vaccine location at ourshot.in.gov or by calling Indiana 211 (866-211-9966). Appointments are recommended, but many sites do accept walk-ins.

Marion County COVID-19 vaccination and test clinics continue

The Marion County Public Health Department (MCPHD) continues to provide free COVID-19 vaccination and testing to anyone interested in receiving these services.

MCPHD is operating one COVID-19 testing site, which is a drive-thru clinic located at 3838 N. Rural St. in Indianapolis.

The clinic’s current hours are Monday-Friday from 8:30 a.m.-3:30 p.m. This clinic offers PCR testing only and no rapid testing. A list of additional test sites registered with the Indiana Department of Health is available at coronavirus.in.gov.

Appointments for COVID-19 testing at the MCPHD location are not required but are available by visiting marionhealth.org/indycovid or calling 317-221-5515.

MCPHD is also offering COVID-19 vaccines at its district health offices, ACTION Health Center, and four other locations in Marion County. Appointments for vaccines are not required but are recommended. 

Please visit ourshot.in.gov or call 2-1-1 to find a vaccination clinic.

Marion County March clinic schedule

  • Northeast District Health Office, 6042 E. 21st St.
    Mondays: 12 p.m. – 4 p.m.
    Tuesdays: 3 p.m. – 7 p.m.
  • Eagledale Plaza Health Office, 2802 Lafayette Road
    Tuesdays: 8 a.m. – 12 p.m.
  • Northwest District Health Office, 6940 N. Michigan Road
    Thursdays: 3 p.m. – 7 p.m.
  • South District Health Office, 7551 S. Shelby St.
    Mondays: 3 p.m. – 7 p.m.
    Fridays: 8 a.m. – 12 p.m.
  • ACTION Health Center, 2868 N. Pennsylvania St.
    Wednesdays: 3 p.m. – 5 p.m.
  • Martindale-Brightwood Public Library Branch, 2435 N. Sherman Drive (ages 12-over only)
    Tuesday through Friday: 10 a.m. – 3:30 p.m.
    Saturdays: 10 a.m. – 1 p.m.
  • College Avenue Public Library Branch, 4180 N. College Ave. (ages 12-over only)
    Tuesday through Friday: 10 a.m. – 3:30 p.m.
    Saturdays: 10 a.m. – 1 p.m.
  • East 38th Street Public Library Branch, 5420 E. 38th St.  (ages 12-over only)
    Tuesday through Friday: 10 a.m. – 3:30 p.m.
    Saturdays: 10 a.m. – 1 p.m.
  • IndyGo Carson Transit Center, 201 E. Washington St.  (ages 12-over only)
    Tuesdays: 10 a.m. – 2 p.m.
    Wednesdays: 10 a.m. – 2 p.m.
    Thursdays: 10 a.m. – 2 p.m.

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