Indiana coronavirus updates for April 25, 2022 | ICIN

The latest updates on the coronavirus pandemic for Monday, April 25, 2022.

INDIANAPOLIS — Here are Monday’s latest updates on the coronavirus pandemic, including the latest news on COVID-19 vaccinations and testing in Indiana.

Registrations for the vaccine are now open for Hoosiers 5 and older through the Indiana State Department of Health. This story will be updated over the course of the day with more news on the COVID-19 pandemic.

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Beijing to mass-test most of city as COVID-19 cases mount

 Beijing will conduct mass testing of most of its 21 million people, authorities announced Monday, as a new COVID-19 outbreak sparked stockpiling of food by residents worried about the possibility of a Shanghai-style lockdown.

The Chinese capital began mass testing people in one of its 16 districts where most of the new cases have been found. The city also imposed lockdowns on individual residential buildings and one section of the city. Late in the day, health officials said the testing would be expanded Tuesday to all but five outlying districts.

While only 70 cases have been found since the outbreak surfaced Friday, authorities have rolled out strict measures under China’s “zero-COVID” approach to try to prevent a further spread of the virus.

Latest US, world numbers

There have been more than 80.98 million confirmed cases of COVID-19 in the United States as of 5:45 a.m. ET Monday, according to Johns Hopkins University. There have been more than 991,250 deaths recorded in the U.S.

Worldwide, there have been more than 509.56 million confirmed coronavirus cases with more than 6.21 million deaths and more than 11.24 billion vaccine doses administered.


For most people, the coronavirus causes mild or moderate symptoms. For some, especially older adults and people with existing health problems, it can cause more severe illness like pneumonia, or death.

COVID shots still work but researchers hunt new improvements

COVID-19 vaccines still offer strong protection against severe illness and death, but Moderna and Pfizer are testing combination shots as a possible new kind of booster. 

The vaccines now available in the U.S. were made to fight the original version of the virus. Variants are chipping away at some of their benefits, particularly their effectiveness against mild infection. The newer vaccine versions being tested are mixes — the original vaccine plus protection against the super-contagious omicron mutant. 

Other companies are pursuing nasal vaccines that might one day better prevent milder infections. The hunt for improvements comes amid concern that “booster fatigue” may dampen public confidence in the successful shots.

Updating the vaccine recipe to match the latest variants is risky, because the next mutant could be completely unrelated. So companies are taking a cue from the flu vaccine, which offers protection against three or four different strains in one shot every year.

Moderna and Pfizer are testing 2-in-1 COVID-19 protection that they hope to offer this fall. Each “bivalent” shot would mix the original, proven vaccine with an omicron-targeted version.

Mask mandates return to US college campuses as cases rise

Facing a rise in COVID-19, several U.S. universities are reinstating mask mandates, sometimes just days after dropping them. Mandates were shed widely in the wake of spring break as case numbers dropped following a winter surge fueled by the omicron variant. 

Colleges in Washington, D.C., New York, Pennsylvania, Massachusetts, Connecticut and Texas have reimposed a range of virus measures, with Howard University moving to remote learning amid a surge in cases in the nation’s capital.

This is the third straight academic year that has been upended by COVID-19, meaning soon-to-be seniors have yet to experience a normal college year.

CDC: COVID was 3rd leading cause of death in US again for 2021

For the second year in a row, COVID-19 was the third leading cause of death in the United States after heart disease and cancer, according to a report released Friday by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. 

The provisional data from 2021 showed heart disease claimed about 693,000 lives, all forms of cancer claimed just over 605,000 lives and COVID-19 was the underlying cause of death for around 415,000 American deaths last year.

According to the report, COVID-19 was listed as a contributing cause of death for around another 45,000 deaths from January-December 2021. 

This comes on the heels of 2021 being named the deadliest year in U.S. history, with data showing COVID-19 was the main reason for the increase in deaths.  

In total, there were 3.465 million deaths last year, or about 80,000 more than 2020’s record-setting total.

Moderna announces step toward updating COVID shots for fall

Moderna hopes to offer updated COVID-19 boosters in the fall that combine its original vaccine with protection against the omicron variant. On Tuesday, it reported a preliminary hint that such an approach might work.

Today’s COVID-19 vaccines all are based on the original version of the coronavirus. But the virus continues to mutate, with the super-contagious omicron variant — and its siblings — the latest threat.

Before omicron came along, Moderna was studying a combination shot that added protection against an earlier variant named beta. Tuesday, the company said people given that beta-original vaccine combination produced more antibodies capable of fighting several variants — including omicron — than today’s regular booster triggers.

While the antibody increase was modest, Moderna’s goal is to produce a combination shot that specifically targets omicron.

2nd COVID-19 booster shot available to Hoosiers 50 and up

The Indiana Department of Health announced Wednesday that Hoosiers age 50 and older, as well as those 12 and older with weakened immune systems, are now eligible to receive a second mRNA COVID-19 booster shot at least four months after their first booster dose.

The announcement comes one day after the Food and Drug Administration authorized an extra dose of the Pfizer or Moderna vaccine for that age group and and certain younger people with severely weakened immune systems.

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention later recommended the extra shot as an option but stopped short of urging that those eligible rush out and get it right away.

The IDOH is advising vaccine providers that they can begin administering second boosters of the Moderna and Pfizer vaccines to people who qualify.

The CDC also says that adults who received a primary vaccine and booster dose of the Johnson & Johnson vaccine at least four months ago may now receive a second booster dose of either mRNA vaccine.

You can find a vaccine location at ourshot.in.gov or by calling Indiana 211 (866-211-9966). Appointments are recommended, but many sites do accept walk-ins.

Marion County COVID-19 vaccination and test clinics continue

The Marion County Public Health Department (MCPHD) continues to provide free COVID-19 vaccination and testing to anyone interested in receiving these services.

MCPHD is operating one COVID-19 testing site, which is a drive-thru clinic located at 3838 N. Rural St. in Indianapolis.

The clinic’s current hours are Monday-Friday from 8:30 a.m.-3:30 p.m. This clinic offers PCR testing only and no rapid testing. A list of additional test sites registered with the Indiana Department of Health is available at coronavirus.in.gov.

Appointments for COVID-19 testing at the MCPHD location are not required but are available by visiting marionhealth.org/indycovid or calling 317-221-5515.

MCPHD is also offering COVID-19 vaccines at its district health offices, ACTION Health Center, and four other locations in Marion County. Appointments for vaccines are not required but are recommended. 

Please visit ourshot.in.gov or call 2-1-1 to find a vaccination clinic.

Marion County March clinic schedule

  • Northeast District Health Office, 6042 E. 21st St.
    Mondays: 12 p.m. – 4 p.m.
    Tuesdays: 3 p.m. – 7 p.m.
  • Eagledale Plaza Health Office, 2802 Lafayette Road
    Tuesdays: 8 a.m. – 12 p.m.
  • Northwest District Health Office, 6940 N. Michigan Road
    Thursdays: 3 p.m. – 7 p.m.
  • South District Health Office, 7551 S. Shelby St.
    Mondays: 3 p.m. – 7 p.m.
    Fridays: 8 a.m. – 12 p.m.
  • ACTION Health Center, 2868 N. Pennsylvania St.
    Wednesdays: 3 p.m. – 5 p.m.
  • Martindale-Brightwood Public Library Branch, 2435 N. Sherman Drive (ages 12-over only)
    Tuesday through Friday: 10 a.m. – 3:30 p.m.
    Saturdays: 10 a.m. – 1 p.m.
  • College Avenue Public Library Branch, 4180 N. College Ave. (ages 12-over only)
    Tuesday through Friday: 10 a.m. – 3:30 p.m.
    Saturdays: 10 a.m. – 1 p.m.
  • East 38th Street Public Library Branch, 5420 E. 38th St.  (ages 12-over only)
    Tuesday through Friday: 10 a.m. – 3:30 p.m.
    Saturdays: 10 a.m. – 1 p.m.
  • IndyGo Carson Transit Center, 201 E. Washington St.  (ages 12-over only)
    Tuesdays: 10 a.m. – 2 p.m.
    Wednesdays: 10 a.m. – 2 p.m.
    Thursdays: 10 a.m. – 2 p.m.

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